Tag Archives: digital

Roy and Josh


http://youtu.be/b0QMQwRx1q8

BitGold is the modern day embodiment of the global internet data/gold crypt envisioned in Neal Stepenson’s Cryptonomicon. While “reading” the Cryptonomicon last August (the first time) I began searching the Internet for digital gold solutions. I discovered several failed platforms … and BitGold. Coincidentally, BitGold had just announced entry into the US market.

YouTube and the Internet are awash with bombastic exhortations for and against the ownership of gold, fraught with dire predictions of the collapse of the US dollar and collapse of the global monetary system. Roy and Josh are above all that. Yes, they do point out the limitations of fiat money systems and yes, they do remind us that gold maintains its value literally forever, but they are calm, low key, and well reasoned. In coming posts, I will share those videos and other links that I find most interesting or useful. If you are interested, you can of course do your own research starting at BitGold.com.

The Race – Backstory

This is the story behind The Race

 The Race (Radio Edit) 

 RML

RMLV 

 Christmas 2003, “Number One Son” gave me the very first Sony Cyber-shot DSC-T1, that he had picked up while studying abroad in Japan. It had not yet been released in the states.


Image courtesy of Steves Digicams 

The specs were impressive for the day: 5 mega-pixel, 3.6″w x 2.4″h x 0.8″d (91mm x 60mm x 21mm), 6.3 oz. / 180g. Click on the camera image for a review and detailed specs. My cell phone in 2004 was the standard flip phone. I don’t even recall if it had camera. If it did, it was worthless.

This was the first camera I could carry in my pocket. I could take it everywhere. With the USB cable I could relatively easily transfer pictures from it to my computer. I had QuickTime Pro on my computer and realized that if the pictures were numbered sequentially QuickTime could turn them into a movie. I began to experiment with stop action animation and time lapse photography. The Race is one of my best.

I had to build a holder for the camera in order to mount it to a tripod. The actors were my sons’ Warhammer figures, Russian toy cars I had collected in the 90s while working there, other toy vehicles, a cat toy, and a robotic spider.

The entire video at 6fps (frames per second) is only 30 seconds long. I filmed the actual race first on the 19th of June and then decided to film the starting line sequence the next day to extend the length. I initially used the Beatles Birthday as the soundtrack. The final 30 second cut lived on my work computer for over a decade, copied over with all of my files each time I got a newer PC.

Last week I decided to try to get it onto my iPhone. I guess I could have done a USB iTunes to iPhone transfer, but that would have meant upgrading the decades old iTunes that I never use at work. So I emailed it to myself via Gmail.

It opened fine on my iPhone, but the sound would not play. I opened it in iMovie and then managed to add Birthday to the soundtrack. Here I digress. For reasons unknown iMovie would only recognize recently purchased songs on my iPhone. Here I digress again, I just discovered that you don’t get the iCloud download icon in Music if WiFi is turned off. I can’t find the setting in 8.1.2 to make it visible. Back up one digression, so I repurchased Birthday and used it.

However, when I attempted to save it back to my camera roll I got an error. After many hours of frustration I decided to look for video format converters on the Apple App Store. I ended up buying two: 

The Video Converter – Convert videos to and from file formats! by SmoothMobile, LLC https://appsto.re/us/rD2p1.i

MConverter Medias Converter by bill santiago  https://appsto.re/us/59UVL.i

I am not endorsing either of these … and there are many others to choose from.

The original version of The Race was in MOV format and needed to be converted to MP4 format. Once done, I could export it to the camera roll. Then I decided that Born To Be Wild would be a better fit. So I redid the 30s clip again.

Now to upload to Vimeo.



All for 30 seconds of audio. How do others get away with uploading entire songs, albums, music videos, movies?

Alas it is what it is. So I searched iTunes for Royalty Free Music, found 

Instrumentals for TV Productions, Podcasts, Movies, and Jingles by Royalty Free Music https://itun.es/us/MZVNv

and chose the first recording for the soundtrack. It was 99 cents.

I liked the song enough that I created the looped versions in order to be able to play the entire song

I don’t know anything about DRM (Digital Rights Management), but I have to assume that that 30s clip of  Born To Be Wild had a DRM tag that immediately told Vimeo “NO NO NO”. I suppose it could have checked a Shazam-like audio database, but how does that explain all the other entries the are longer and more blatant. I assume there is a way to strip off the DRM tag. I need to investigate this.

There has got to be an affordable way for individuals to license mainstream audio at an affordable price for use in homemade videos posted to the web. See my rant https://contrafactual.com/2014/12/14/21st-century-i-p-2/

Anyway back to the making of The Race. It was old-school “arrange the figures, take a photo, move the figures, take a photo, repeat” … 181 times. I couldn’t walk the next day – my thighs were in agony. 

Speaking of old-school, if you haven’t seen it check out the 1979 Wizard of Speed and Time by Mike Jittlov

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GoLhLn9hVkE

http://www.wizworld.com

I’ll (click)

be (click)

seeing (click)

you (click)



EFF

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About EFF

From the Internet to the iPod, technologies are transforming our society and empowering us as speakers, citizens, creators, and consumers. When our freedoms in the networked world come under attack, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is the first line of defense. EFF broke new ground when it was founded in 1990—well before the Internet was on most people’s radar—and continues to confront cutting-edge issues defending free speech, privacy, innovation, and consumer rights today. From the beginning, EFF has championed the public interest in every critical battle affecting digital rights.

 

My last post (21st Century I. P.) got two reblogs, one reply, and several comments. If you feel as strongly about this as I do, please visit their website by clicking on the EFF banner at the top of this post. If they make their case to you, please donate. In my last post I said that only the rich could afford the time and money to hire the lawyers to write and represent the laws. The EFF is everyman’s representative in the the new digital age.

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