Category Archives: Fiction

Death in Paradise

My newest diversion … watching Death in Paradise on NETFLIX. British TV. Murder mystery. Crime solving. Humor.

A British inspector is transferred to Saint-Marie’s police department, but he hates the sun, sea, and sand. The series follow his investigations into murders on the island.

Actually the reviews below aren’t that favorable and include spoilers … but I am only on the second episode and I am enjoying it so far. I guess all shows eventually run their course.

Watch it if you can … (or not)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_in_Paradise_(TV_series)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1888075/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01pvmf6

Arrival

OK – this is perhaps my favorite movie – ever

Unless you absolutely HATE Sci-Fi, you owe it to yourself to see this movie … as many times as necessary to understand it. Absolutely worth seeing in a theater.

This is drama, a love story, a study in inter-species communication, a triumph of problem solving. It has humor and joy and sadness.

It is awesome and awe inspiring.

If you only see one movie at the theater this year – see this movie.

PS: I was not kidding when I said “as many times as necessary to understand it”, although I could have said “as many times as necessary to catch all of the foreshadowing, hints, clues, and twists.” This is a complex movie. 

Cryptonomicon


Order it from Amazon


Order it from Audible

I just finished listening to Cryptonomicon for the second time. Cryptonomicon, published in 1999, is eerily prescient of the technological developments since then. Written at the dawn of the Internet it presages digital banking, digital encryption, and global telecommunications.

Cryptonomicon is a fascinating mix of historical fiction, science fiction, and techno-thriller. It follows two timelines – one in World War II, the other present day. The World War Two timeline follows the exploits and adventures of real and fictional characters involved in formulating and breaking the Nazi and Nipponese codes used to send vital wartime communications. The present day timeline follows what one quickly learns are the descendants of the WWII cast of characters who are building a data crypt and associated digital infrastructure in the Phillipines and Sultanate of Kinkuta. The past and present are woven together in a fine tapestry.

Neal Stephenson is at his best in Cryptonomicon. It is filled with action, suspense, and humor. A good read and a better listen. This is a must-read book for devotees of Stephenson, WWII, cryptology, and the Internet. I give it four thumbs up.